The Suge Knight Trial – Can I Get A Witness

Suge-Knight-grainy

We’ve got some catching up to do. I never told you about Marvin like I promised. And it’s been quite the saga. If there’s anyone out there who can get the Sugar Bear out of the big house, it’s Marvin Kincy. Big Homey is starving for Marvin right now. But what are the chances?

Marvin was a witness to the whole scene at Tam’s Burgers. He’s been around a bit. Now 64, he was in and out of San Quentin for about 25 years. He’s a bonafide “Old G” who’s keeping his nose clean these days – you can Google him. This June, he organized the Dre Day celebration in Compton. Go back a bit and he crops up in pieces about the LA riots. “I ran Elm Street – I ran Freddy Krueger – been there since 1959,” he told police, after the Tam’s Burgers incident. “I’ve been there through the thick and the thin.”

When the cops called Marvin in for questioning after that grim day at Tam’s, he did the right thing. He gave them a full statement – specific, detailed and clear. He didn’t incriminate anyone, he didn’t “rat”. He just explained what’s on the tape we’ve all seen, so that there might be justice in this case. He deserves a round of applause, really.

And what’s more, of all the interviews in the Murder Book – a file of evidence that both prosecution and defense attorneys receive – Marvin’s is the one that will most likely set Suge Knight free. Because his account matches Suge’s to the letter, and it blows the prosecution’s case out of the water. As he says in the interview: “In my heart, I don’t believe that Suge intentionally hit Terry or Bone.”

If you haven’t read my Esquire piece about this trial, please do. It’s full of mystery, this one. And it explains why Marvin’s testimony would be so critical, if only he’d give it. I’m going to break down a few pieces of it here – all these screengrabs are from the interview transcript, which misspells Kincy’s surname, as Kince. (Btw, sorry about the shabby scans…)

  1. He says that Knight didn’t arrive at the scene angry, spoiling for a fight as the prosecution alleges. Rather, he was just talking, when Bones came over and attacked.

Suge-wasn't-angry

2. When Suge reversed and hit Bone, Marvin says it’s possible Suge didn’t even see him.

Suge-maybe-didn't-see-Bone

3. He said that Bone’s argument about driving to the set and taking a wrong turn into Tam’s is ridiculous – the set was nowhere near.

The-set-was-miles-off

4. He also said that Suge Knight is no gangster. It’s mostly myth.

Suge's-Tony-Soprano,-it's-an-image

And:

not-many-killers-named-Suge

I could go on. It’s a revealing interview. As I write in Esquire, he mentions a friend of Bone’s – Jimmy Chris – at one point, and alludes to a beef that he and Suge may have. He says that if Suge looked up, he’d see Jimmy running towards him, which would explain why Suge might step on the gas.

So the task for Suge’s attorneys is clearly to subpoena Marvin, get him to appear or sign an affidavit, corroborating this account. It might mean freedom for Suge Knight. But as it is, they can’t find him, so far as I know. For a while, there was a rumor he’d moved to Palmdale to hide out.

Then, in the wake of my Esquire piece, Marvin suddenly appeared on my radar, and in the strangest way, too. I got a call from this reporter saying that his friend Marvin was freaked out because I’d falsely accused him of being a snitch and his life was now in danger. In the meantime, Marvin hired an attorney in Pasadena to complain to theEsquire lawyers about my “shoddy journalism”. A shitty move, I thought. He could have just emailed me. I would have shown him this:

Marv-interview-Feb-2015

And this:

Marv-Interview,-March-21

So to clear the air, I contacted Marvin. The reporter helped put us in touch. I told him that I had his interview transcript, all seven pages of it, dated March 21st. And that there was another report too, by the LA Sheriffs, dated February 16th, that gave an account of another interview with Marvin a few days earlier. I said, look, this is a high profile case, there’s a legitimate public interest, and my information is sound, so…

But Marvin didn’t care. He just denied and denied ever talking to the police. It was bizarre. A truly Trumpian disregard for facts. He insisted that what actually happened was that the police put the name “Kince” on the transcript, and his name is “Kincy”, so they must have spoken to some other guy. Also: Was his signature on the interview? No? Well then, it’s just the police trying to frame him, put him in the sights of gangbangers in Compton. It’s a conspiracy, man! Can’t you see? “Me and the police ain’t never been friends,” he told me. “They have to catch me. I don’t voluntarily go and talk to people.”

I’ve written about the absurdity of snitching before. This was another trip down that tunnel.  I had wanted to tell Marvin that I admired his courage in telling the cops what happened, and standing up for the truth of this case. But he refused to admit his own valor, so instead I told him that I wasn’t buying his denial, but I would still put a line in the piece about how he denies talking to the cops. And he seemed appreciate that. “You talk about this G-code and this and that,” he says. “But if a homey gets accused of a murder, and he didn’t do it, and you find out another dude did it, either you turn him in, or you kill him yourself. But Bone’s still walking around here, so the G-code ain’t shit.” That was August 3rd.

Since then, things have gone from bad to worse for Suge. Changing attorneys from Matthew Fletcher to Tom Mesereau appears to have only made Judge Ronald Coen harden his position. While Coen seemed to enjoy Fletcher’s pugnacious style during the preliminary hearing, even complimenting him on his work, with Mesereau, he has offered no quarter. No, he would not move the case from downtown to Compton. No, bail would not be reduced. No, Suge would not be allowed to see his own doctor – was Mesereau insinuating that the doctors at Men’s Central Jail were not doing their jobs?

At the last hearing in November, Mesereau complained that he had only just received the Murder Book – he needed more time to prepare. This is nearly six months after signing on as his attorney.

Maybe it’s a ruse. Maybe he’s preparing to blow the roof off this case, and reveal, come show time, who actually set up that ambush at Tam’s.  Maybe he’s busy subpoenaing Marvin right now.

Or maybe not. In which case, you have to feel for the big man. That prison food must be getting old.

As always Marvin said it best. (Not that Marvin).

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